Greenpeace Southeast Asia


I will return to share what I learnt here … We can make change… by Chuck Baclagon
July 27, 2010, 10:11 am
Filed under: Indonesia, Life at work, Volunteers | Tags: , ,

I am very grateful to be selected as one of the Greenpeace University (GPU) students 2010. There are only nine of us representing Indonesia and Malaysia. Of course that makes me proud. I’m proud to be here among those who came from various regions in Indonesia; Didit, Mayang, Novi, Rika, Sheila, Silka, Viktor, and Simpson from Malaysia. You are all my great friends.

From the beginning I promised myself that I would open my mind to accept all the materials that we would be given at the Greenpeace University. Many people didn’t agree with my choice to take part in GPU. They said things like “Greenpeace is eco-fascist”, “Greenpeace is not the organization that fights for the prosperity of communities”, “You should stay at home, you will learn more here…” But may people also supported me, congratulating me on being one of the chosen few to be a GPU student. I also asked to return to Aceh and help with their advocacy work after the graduation. Their motivation made me believe I will be able to become a better campaigner in future.

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World Environment Day: Bearing Witness Trip- Angat Watershed by dalisayliwanag

From Solar Generation – Pilipinas

Where does water come from?  A question that has been asked of me unexpectedly in one of the meetings I’ve attended for a cause.  I was taken aback for it was actually the first time that I heard someone asked that kind of question.  I then began formulated uncertain answers such as “from the faucet?” or “from the purified water station near our apartment?” or rather “from the sea?”  Could be, right?  And from that moment on, I keep on asking myself, “where does water really come from?”  This is the question that all of us ought to know the answer.

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New Zealand’s biggest protest march in living memory by Chuck Baclagon
May 1, 2010, 7:33 am
Filed under: Greenpeace, Volunteers | Tags: , , , ,

Biggest protest march in living memory - March Against Mining

We expected 20,000. We HOPED for 30,000. We got nearly double that. In the biggest protest march in living memory in New Zealand, 50,000 turned out in Auckland to march against Government plans to mine coal and other minerals in national reserves.

When the New Zealand Government announced its intention to open coal mines in the country’s prime conservation land, including some of its matchless National Parks, Greenpeace New Zealand set about mobilizing supporters, celebrities, and opposing politicians to say “no.”

Lucy Lawless, best known for her role as Xena the Warrior Princess, teamed up with Robyn Malcolm, a popular television and theatre actress, to call the decision “19th century thinking in a carbon-constrained world” and created a video of tourist reactions to the proposal in one of New Zealand’s parks.

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Greenpeace boat team: Saan galing ang tubig na iniinom nyo? by Chuck Baclagon

Greenpeace boat team members, Tomas and Moss show us where our drinking water comes from.

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Can you count how many they are? by Chuck Baclagon

View of the night sky from the Water Watch Campsite.

Astronomers say that on a clear, moonless night in a place far away from city lights, you should be able to see about 2000 stars. The darker the skies, the more stars you can see. Astronomers have calculated that there are about 6,000 stars potentially visible with the unaided eye, below are images of the night sky at the Water Watch camp, could you count how many stars there are in the pictures?

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What would it be like if everybody pitches in? by Chuck Baclagon

13 April 2010

Greenpeace volunteers waterproofing the camp.

The first night at the Greenpeace Water Watch camp, we were met by light drizzling, which eventually turned into a considerable downpour at around 5:00AM and lasted a  bit less than two hours. Geologist C. P. David, who was kind enough to offer his expertise in setting up instruments to measure climate-related indicators such as precipitation and water level here in Angat Dam, is scheduled to arrive a bit later this morning.  Luckily, he already quickly briefed some of us about how a rain gauge works a few days before we set off for Angat, and we had put one up right on the camp.

The reading showed up as one millimetre rainfall.  Looking at our water level markers, it seemed to have zero effect on the receding levels in Angat. About a foot lower (we will be making more accurate measurements from the markers in three days), it still seemed to confirm the trending estimated for the past couple of weeks by the Angat Watershed Area Team (AWAT) – around a meter lower every 3-4 days.

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There’s something about EDSA… by Chuck Baclagon

EDSA, is the main circumferential road and highway of Metro Manila as it functions as an important commuting artery between the northern and southern parts of the metropolitan area. Moreover it is known for place in Philippine history as it served as a venue to some of the biggest political upheavals in recent times.

Yesterday, Greenpeace volunteers  unfurled banners along the stretch of EDSA to challenge presidential candidates to take up environmental concerns in their campaign platforms, especially since these issues impact on basic needs: clean energy, clean water and safe food.

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