Greenpeace Southeast Asia


Let’s get to work…. by Chuck Baclagon
October 11, 2010, 8:48 am
Filed under: Greenpeace, Life at work, Philippines | Tags: , , , ,

We need our politicians to Get to Work.

The past week leading up to last week was a rush. It has been quite a while since we have seen ourselves as part of something bigger, but then again it’s easy to be anaesthetized if much time is spent working within the framework of your organization only. However, the Global Work Party comes as a wake-up call, not only to world leaders but for people like me, as I’ve often worked within the confines of the office.
I remember yesterday as I was speaking at the last of the various Global Work Party activities that we went to and I was wearing a TckTckTck t-shirt and I said: “I’m wearing this t-shirt to demonstrate the irony of the climate problem as TckTckTck is an unprecedented global alliance, One of over 10,000 events in nearly every country on earth organized by TckTckTck partners and supporters in 2009 representing hundreds of millions of people from all walks of life, who are united by a desire to see a strong global deal on climate change. It was made up of leading environment, development, and faith-based NGO’s, youth groups, trade unions and individuals, and we are calling for a fair, ambitious and binding climate change agreement.
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Updates From the Dam to the Farmlands by ocho

As I walked in the 5 hectares of land in Brgy. Mangumbali, Candaba Pampanga, I can feel the land crumbling under my feet. The land is so dried that Mr. Numeriano Alabado was not able to harvest any rice crop that he planted in his area. His fields are now full of bigcracks that if you’re not cautious, the soil might collapse.

Their water source is from UPRIS-Upper Pampanga River Irrigation System.Pantabangan Dam is the main source of their irrigation system, because the dam has stopped supplying water due to drought; their rice lands have been destroyed. Almost all the farmers in this town have lost their income due to extreme drought. All of them we’re saying that this was the first time that they’ve experienced this kind of phenomenon.

The local government provided them aid by giving them STW or Shallow Tube Well but its already late to be use for this season because of lack of water. For them, only rain could restore their devastated lands.

A.C. Dimatatac


Greenpeace boat team: Saan galing ang tubig na iniinom nyo? by Chuck Baclagon

Greenpeace boat team members, Tomas and Moss show us where our drinking water comes from.

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Water Watch: Day 5 by Chuck Baclagon

When the GMA news crew arrived at camp today, we had to make some quick decisions whether it would be prudent to bring them along with us to try and cross the Kamanoyo mountain to get to the main body of Matulid River on the other side.  According to the AWAT rangers, it usually takes Dumagats around 30-45 minutes to cross the forest. But Dumagats are fairly known to move like Spiderman even on the sheer slopes of Angat.  We were also told that the last time a band of AWAT personnel crossed Kamanoyo, it took them seven hours, but they didn’t have a Dumagat guide with them that time. Continue reading



Can you count how many they are? by Chuck Baclagon

View of the night sky from the Water Watch Campsite.

Astronomers say that on a clear, moonless night in a place far away from city lights, you should be able to see about 2000 stars. The darker the skies, the more stars you can see. Astronomers have calculated that there are about 6,000 stars potentially visible with the unaided eye, below are images of the night sky at the Water Watch camp, could you count how many stars there are in the pictures?

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Day 4 in pictures by Chuck Baclagon

Here are some images on our 4th day on camp:

The Water Watch team.

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Water Watch: Day 4 by Chuck Baclagon

The water level in Angat Dam breached the 180 meter above sea level (masl) critical point at around 3pm on April 13, and we got word that it finally made the news headlines this morning.

A news crew from the GMA network, led by reporter Cesar Apolinario, visited the camp to do interviews and take some shots of the things that were going on in the watershed.  They arrived in the afternoon and had to rush to make the deadline for the evening news.

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