Greenpeace Southeast Asia


Updates From the Dam to the Farmlands by ocho

As I walked in the 5 hectares of land in Brgy. Mangumbali, Candaba Pampanga, I can feel the land crumbling under my feet. The land is so dried that Mr. Numeriano Alabado was not able to harvest any rice crop that he planted in his area. His fields are now full of bigcracks that if you’re not cautious, the soil might collapse.

Their water source is from UPRIS-Upper Pampanga River Irrigation System.Pantabangan Dam is the main source of their irrigation system, because the dam has stopped supplying water due to drought; their rice lands have been destroyed. Almost all the farmers in this town have lost their income due to extreme drought. All of them we’re saying that this was the first time that they’ve experienced this kind of phenomenon.

The local government provided them aid by giving them STW or Shallow Tube Well but its already late to be use for this season because of lack of water. For them, only rain could restore their devastated lands.

A.C. Dimatatac
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Up North: Still No Water by ocho

We’re on our last day of our travel in the drought affected lands of Central and North Luzon. We went to Brgy. San Isidro in Naguilan, La Union wherein we met some farmers who are members of Pakisama, an organization which is into sustainable agriculture and supports capacity building of  farmers in the North.

Mr. Ronaldo B. Calica, a farmer whose crops are mainly corn, said that this is the worst drought ever. The sources of water in their area are the small creeks nearby and they are mostly dependent to rain. According to him, the last rainfall they had was when typhoon Pepeng hit the country last October 2009. After that, they didn’t experience any rainfall at all. He normally earns around 10 to 15 thousand pesos from his 1 hectare of corn but now it’s zero balance. He spent too much for the gasoline of his water pump and fertilizers but it was all for nothing because his land got dried up due to insufficient supply of water. He showed us his corn crops that are so small he can no longer use it. Continue reading



Propaganda scuttles action in Copenhagen by Jenny Tuazon
December 17, 2009, 11:34 am
Filed under: Stop climate change | Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

The average global temperature increase of human industrialism, caused primarily by the burning of coal and oil and secondly by the destruction of the world’s carbon capturing forests. Note that short term fluctuations — up or down — do not significantly change the modern warming trend.

“There are many true things that are not useful for the vulgar crowd to know; and certain things, which although they are false it is expedient for the people to believe otherwise.”

– Augustine of Hippo, City of God, 426 A.D.

Car salesmen and burger tycoons have sabotaged the most important decision of our generation.

As the highly-anticipated Copenhagen climate summit limps towards indecision, the largest money-making corporations on the planet privately celebrate their ability to undermine science and hijack the international political process.

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Push it! by Chuck Baclagon

How far can you push a big inflatable globe on a road in Hua Hin, Thailand?

Several kilometers maybe? Today, we tried it today and covered all of 200 meters.

Today just happens to be the second day of the 15th ASEAN Summit taking place in Hua Hin, one of Thailand’s more famous resort towns.

Ten Southeast Asian heads of state are meeting inside Dusit Thani Hotel talking about issues such as regional cooperation, human rights, global economy, disasters, and climate change.

Today, incidentally, is also the International Day of Climate Action.

อาเซียน: จงจริงจังต่อการยุติภัยคุกคามโลกร้อน ASEAN: Get serious about climate threat! by you.

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Behind that masked grey visage by Chuck Baclagon

On Sunday, September 20, Chang(e) Caravan joined the citizens of Chanchoengsao, in their local festivities that combined the Global Car-Free Day with the provincial river- protection day.

Strangely enough, this was our first day in a town, after walking for days skirting around the Khao Yai National Park, and none of us, including our great friends and fellow-travelers, the elephants were particularly happy about it.

But the enthusiastic welcome by hundreds of bikers from local bike club, students from the local schools and colleges, farmers and traders who are members of agri-nature foundation and soldiers of local military unit, made the short walk through town worthwhile.

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Dumbo Drop by Chuck Baclagon

September 15, 2009

No, I don’t mean what Um has to clean up, but the process of transporting elephants across provincial borders. An operation as complicated as the movie Operation Dumbo Drop.

As required by Thai law and provincial administration regulations, Elephants cannot walk across provincial borders, they can only be transported by trucks, with prior permissions of the livestock department.

So, early this morning after their usual enormous breakfast; with the help of the mahouts, our veterinarian and elephant transport experts, our great friends delicately clambered onto the back of a truck specially designed for them and were driven across the borders which an elephant can hardly tell, but let us not get into the irony of this bureaucratic joke.

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Washington, we have a problem. by Chuck Baclagon

Xiaowei, a Chinese rock-star, Tshepo, an African activist and Shane, an American-Indian student are part of the small Greenpeace team of Thai and Filipino staff and volunteers, that walked the entire distance of 12 kms with the Chang(e) caravan today.

Watching them through the view finder of my camera, I was reminded of Margaret Mead’s words, “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”

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