Greenpeace Southeast Asia


Deep Green: Real Sustainability by Chuck Baclagon
February 16, 2010, 3:40 am
Filed under: Deep Green, Greenpeace | Tags: , ,

Cultural habits – like people – go through stages when they face death. Dr. Elizabeth Kübler-Ross described this process as the ‘five stages of grief’ – denial, anger, bargaining and depression, before the final acceptance of reality. In human society, growth economics will eventually collapse in the face of ecological reality. We have witnessed decades of denial and anger about this end of growth, and society now appears to be entering the bargaining stage.

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Sustainability & justice: Do the math by Jenny Tuazon

Most people I talk to support “sustainability” and “social justice” goals. Ecology teaches us that we need to frame these human aspirations in relation to the biological capacity of the earth: the energy, and resources that support our burgeoning populations and economies.

As human society sets out to achieve ecological sustainability and social justice on earth, we face two serious challenges: One, humanity already over-consumes the biological capacity of the planet; and secondly, humanity suffers from a vast gap between rich and poor.

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Are Cities Sustainable? by Chuck Baclagon
September 8, 2009, 7:38 am
Filed under: Deep Green, Greenpeace | Tags: , ,

A reporter from Dubai phoned last week and asked, “Can Dubai become a sustainable city?” and specifically, “Could the tourism industry be sustainable?” In the age of global warming and declining fossil fuels, the entire airline industry is probably not sustainable. Dubai, of course, is not even remotely sustainable.

Dubai is a city built with oil cash, but the global economic recession brought construction schemes to a sudden halt. Many entrepreneurs fled the city, abandoning some 3,000 cars, found with keys in the ignition and maxed-out credit cards in the glove compartments.

Between 2002-2008, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and its partners invested $600 billion US dollars in Dubai, creating the world’s tallest building and largest shopping mall, man-made islands, and an indoor ski hill. Dubai has a beach ‘designed’ by Versace with chilled sand. Meanwhile, sections of the city have no sewage system, so sewage is collected by truck convoys and driven into the desert, where it seeps back through the sand – and reappears on the Versace beaches.

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Negros: the Philippines’ organic farming capital by Chuck Baclagon

Last August 19, 2009  Greenpeace activists with 400 farmers and members of church and civic groups trooped today to the Negros Occidental provincial capitol to press members of the Sangguniang Panlalawigan (SP). The activity was conducted to encourage the Provincial Council to look into real solutions like organic farming, instead of unreliable, unproven techno fixes like agrochemicals and genetically modified organisms, to address food security and safeguard public health and to secure the future of Negros as the organic farming capital of the Philippines.

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