Greenpeace Southeast Asia


Mr Hayward – this is not a ‘tiny’ matter… by Jenny Tuazon
May 19, 2010, 6:00 pm
Filed under: Oceans | Tags: , , , ,

Paul Horsman is a Greenpeace campaigner, currently in Louisiana to assess the destruction from the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Read his previous Deepwater Horizon blog here.

In a clear attempt to downplay the impacts of BP’s latest oil spill, chief executive, Tony Hayward, recently said “The Gulf of Mexico is a very big ocean. The amount of volume of oil and dispersant we are putting into it is tiny in relation to the total water volume.” His comment shows a cynical disregard for the reality of what is happening here to the environment, wildlife and communities who live and work here on the southern coast of the US.

I’m not sure whether Hayward and the folk at BP are just being arrogant or ignorant – or maybe both.   On Monday I stood in gloopey thick oil accumulating on the beaches at the end of the Mississippi River – at the low water mark and below, the oil was 20-25 centimetres (9-10 inches) thick. Maybe Mr Hayward would care to join me and watch as BP’s oil oozes from the high tidemark to form thick brown streaks down the short beach; or perhaps he could come to the breakwater rocks and see the splattered mess. Continue reading

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Have scientist, will travel by Chuck Baclagon
Dr. Paul Johnson

Dr. Paul Johnson

Yes, it’s true, we do indeed have scientists. And some days, we even let them out of the lab.

Today is one of those days.  Our Greenpeace Chief Scientist, Dr Paul Johnston, has travelled from our international laboratory at the University of Exeter, UK to Ottawa, Canada to further our campaign to create a global network of marine reserves to protect the oceans.

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Fish Now, Pay Later by Chuck Baclagon
September 14, 2009, 4:43 am
Filed under: Defending our Oceans, Life at work, The Esperanza, Volunteers | Tags: , , ,

From the Greenpeace Australia Pacific blog

Just two days ago, the Japanese purse seiner, Fukuichi Maru was pulling in its purse seine net, heavy with freshly caught tuna, when we found them fishing in area 2 of the Pacific high seas. Floating and attached on their left side (or port side as we refer to it in nautical terms), was a FAD made of a very long log with a radio beacon on it. It was the first time that we caught a fishing vessel in the act of purse seining from a FAD.

Seeing this made me shake my head in disbelief. There was a two-month ban on FADs declared by the WCPFC, currently in place. But a major loophole in the ban is being exploited by Japan to continue their high seas plunder of the Pacific.(1)

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FAD Watch (And It’s Not About Trendy Fashion) by Chuck Baclagon

From the Greenpeace Australia Pacific blog

Date: Tuesday, 31 August 2009
Location: High Seas Area 1, Western Pacific Ocean
Weather conditions: Sunny day, clear skies, light breeze
Objective: To look out for FADs

A few days ago, we arrived in the High Seas of the Pacific. Since yesterday, we have been on constant watch, scanning the horizon by day, the radar by night, diligently on the look-out for FADs and fishing boats.

Up in the bridge, Gabriel (one of our dive team, and resident shark expert) was the first to go on FAD watch at 8 in the morning. And, lo and behold, you guessed it … he spotted the very thing we were looking for *ndash; a FAD!

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