Greenpeace Southeast Asia


Water Watch: Day 2 by Chuck Baclagon

One of the volunteers waterproofing the camp.

Early this morning our sleep was cut short by what started out as a drizzle of rain that suddenly became a shower that caught us all by surprise.

Our day started with putting things under the makeshift shed that was hastily created to waterproof our sleep area as well as our electronic equipment. Everyone scrambled to put up some tarps and waterproof our gear and equipment. In the middle of the rain some of us tried putting up a rain gauge to measure the precipitation levels.
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What would it be like if everybody pitches in? by Chuck Baclagon

13 April 2010

Greenpeace volunteers waterproofing the camp.

The first night at the Greenpeace Water Watch camp, we were met by light drizzling, which eventually turned into a considerable downpour at around 5:00AM and lasted a  bit less than two hours. Geologist C. P. David, who was kind enough to offer his expertise in setting up instruments to measure climate-related indicators such as precipitation and water level here in Angat Dam, is scheduled to arrive a bit later this morning.  Luckily, he already quickly briefed some of us about how a rain gauge works a few days before we set off for Angat, and we had put one up right on the camp.

The reading showed up as one millimetre rainfall.  Looking at our water level markers, it seemed to have zero effect on the receding levels in Angat. About a foot lower (we will be making more accurate measurements from the markers in three days), it still seemed to confirm the trending estimated for the past couple of weeks by the Angat Watershed Area Team (AWAT) – around a meter lower every 3-4 days.

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Water Watch: Day1 by Chuck Baclagon

Dead fish that were landlocked when the waters subsided can be found around the water camp area

The star-lit tapestry in the sky signals the end of our first day at camp.

The day started at around 5AM when I was met in the office with colleagues, friends and comrades from Greenpeace, who like me were also preparing their gear for the camp.

A few minutes prior to our departure I wrote of my Facbook status: “umalis para hanapin kung saan galing ang tubig na iniinom mo.” (left to discover where our drinking water comes from.)

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Is our water supply sufficient? by Jenny Tuazon

From Solar Generation – Pilipinas

I know that Sunday should be a rest day given the busy schedules we have weekly but seeing that the climate is continuously changing every second, we shouldn’t be taking a break from taking care of our planet. A little sacrifice and time to take a good glimpse of what is really happening to the Earth and how to help in making the people aware of these things is what we’ve done yesterday until this afternoon. Seeing this tragic scene up close is quite different from what we are informed or in what our current surrounding tells us. Continue reading