Greenpeace Southeast Asia


Water Watch: Day 5 by Chuck Baclagon

When the GMA news crew arrived at camp today, we had to make some quick decisions whether it would be prudent to bring them along with us to try and cross the Kamanoyo mountain to get to the main body of Matulid River on the other side.  According to the AWAT rangers, it usually takes Dumagats around 30-45 minutes to cross the forest. But Dumagats are fairly known to move like Spiderman even on the sheer slopes of Angat.  We were also told that the last time a band of AWAT personnel crossed Kamanoyo, it took them seven hours, but they didn’t have a Dumagat guide with them that time. Continue reading

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Can you count how many they are? by Chuck Baclagon

View of the night sky from the Water Watch Campsite.

Astronomers say that on a clear, moonless night in a place far away from city lights, you should be able to see about 2000 stars. The darker the skies, the more stars you can see. Astronomers have calculated that there are about 6,000 stars potentially visible with the unaided eye, below are images of the night sky at the Water Watch camp, could you count how many stars there are in the pictures?

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Day 4 in pictures by Chuck Baclagon

Here are some images on our 4th day on camp:

The Water Watch team.

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Water Watch: Day 4 by Chuck Baclagon

The water level in Angat Dam breached the 180 meter above sea level (masl) critical point at around 3pm on April 13, and we got word that it finally made the news headlines this morning.

A news crew from the GMA network, led by reporter Cesar Apolinario, visited the camp to do interviews and take some shots of the things that were going on in the watershed.  They arrived in the afternoon and had to rush to make the deadline for the evening news.

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Water Watch: Day 3 by Chuck Baclagon

14 April 2010

Dried up water tributary.

It’s the third day here at the Greenpeace Water Watch Camp in Angat Dam. The night before had been a very clear, starry evening, unlike the previous drizzly night, but the day saw a spectacularly hot summer sun alternating with windy downpours – it was as if Mother Nature herself was showing the classic symptoms of someone having a fever.

Well, maybe she was.

I can’t help but feel a bit down today, unlike yesterday.  Maybe I’m just in need of a bath…I’m not really sure…

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Water Watch: Day 2 by Chuck Baclagon

One of the volunteers waterproofing the camp.

Early this morning our sleep was cut short by what started out as a drizzle of rain that suddenly became a shower that caught us all by surprise.

Our day started with putting things under the makeshift shed that was hastily created to waterproof our sleep area as well as our electronic equipment. Everyone scrambled to put up some tarps and waterproof our gear and equipment. In the middle of the rain some of us tried putting up a rain gauge to measure the precipitation levels.
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What would it be like if everybody pitches in? by Chuck Baclagon

13 April 2010

Greenpeace volunteers waterproofing the camp.

The first night at the Greenpeace Water Watch camp, we were met by light drizzling, which eventually turned into a considerable downpour at around 5:00AM and lasted a  bit less than two hours. Geologist C. P. David, who was kind enough to offer his expertise in setting up instruments to measure climate-related indicators such as precipitation and water level here in Angat Dam, is scheduled to arrive a bit later this morning.  Luckily, he already quickly briefed some of us about how a rain gauge works a few days before we set off for Angat, and we had put one up right on the camp.

The reading showed up as one millimetre rainfall.  Looking at our water level markers, it seemed to have zero effect on the receding levels in Angat. About a foot lower (we will be making more accurate measurements from the markers in three days), it still seemed to confirm the trending estimated for the past couple of weeks by the Angat Watershed Area Team (AWAT) – around a meter lower every 3-4 days.

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